Tuesday, December 12, 2006

Wine and Beer Vacation

What's a wine and beer vacation? Well for me, it is taking the next 3 weeks off from blogging to slow down, drink some wine and beer and enjoy the Holiday season. After 14 months of writing articles, I'm pretty well spent. It also doesn't help that I'm working 60 -70 hours a week and my wife is going through chemotherapy.

I do plan on working on some new articles and such, but won't post them until the new year. So, I'll see you next year.

Enjoy your holidays.

Give generously to those less fortunate.

P.S. - Here are some links to some interesting articles.


Monday, December 04, 2006

Paw Paw Wine



I don't know what inspired me to post a recipe on Paw Paw wine. Maybe it was because I had one about a year ago and enjoyed the flavor? Or, maybe it was because I wanted to post something a little different? Who knows. Well the recipe is listed below and right after that is a little description from Kentucky State University about paw paws.

PAWPAW WINE

* 2-3 lbs ripe pawpaws
* 2 lbs granulated sugar
* 7 pts water
* 1-1/2 tsp citric acid
* 1 tsp pectic enzyme
* 1/2 tsp grape tannin
* 1 tsp yeast nutrient
* wine yeast


Put water on to boil. Meanwhile, peel the fruit and cut into pieces. Put fruit in nylon straining bag, tie closed, and place bag in primary. Mash fruit in bag, pour sugar over fruit and, when boiling, pour water over that. Cover primary and set aside to cool. When room temperature, add all ingredients except yeast. Recover and set aside 12 hours. Add yeast. When the must is fermenting vigorously, stir twice daily for 7 days. Drain bag and squeeze gently to extract most juice and flavor, then transfer juice to secondary. Fit airlock and set aside for 2 months. Rack into sterilized secondary, top up and refit airlock. Rack again after 3 months, top up and refit airlock. Check wine for clarity after additional 3 months. If wine has not cleared, fine with gelatin, wait two weeks, and rack into bottles. Age additional 6-12 months.


The pawpaw is the largest edible fruit that is native to the United States. Pawpaws are indigenous to 26 states in the U.S., in a range extending from northern Florida to southern Ontario and as far west as eastern Nebraska. They have provided delicious and nutritious food for Native Americans, European explorers and settlers, and wild animals. They are still being enjoyed in modern America, chiefly in rural areas. There are 27 varieties (Table 1) currently available from more than 50 commercial nurseries in the U.S.

Most enthusiasts agree that the best way to enjoy pawpaws is to eat them raw, outdoors, picked from the tree when they are perfectly ripe. But there are also numerous ways to use them in the kitchen and extend the enjoyment of their tropical flavor beyond the end of the harvest season.

The unique flavor of the fruit resembles a blend of various tropical flavors, including banana, pineapple, and mango. The flavor and custard-like texture make pawpaws a good substitute for bananas in almost any recipe. The common names, 'poor man's banana,' 'American custard apple,' and 'Kentucky banana' reflect these qualities.

Pawpaw's beautiful, maroon colored flowers appear in the spring, and the clusters of fruit ripen in the fall. The Kentucky harvest season is from late August to mid-October. Ripe pawpaw fruits are easily picked, yielding to a gentle tug. Shaking the tree will make them fall off. (If you try this, don't stand under the fruit clusters, and don't say we didn't warn you.) Ripeness can also be gauged by squeezing gently, as you would judge a peach. The flesh should be soft, and the fruit should have a strong, pleasant aroma. The skin color of ripe fruit on the tree ranges from green to yellow, and dark flecks may appear, as on bananas. The skin of picked or fallen fruit may darken to brown or black.

Fully ripe pawpaws last only a few days at room temperature, but may be kept for a week in the refrigerator. If fruit is refrigerated before it is fully ripe, it can be kept for up to three weeks, and can then be allowed to finish ripening at room temperature. Ripe pawpaw flesh, with skin and seeds removed, can be pureed and frozen for later use. Some people even freeze whole fruits.

Pawpaws are very nutritious fruits. They are high in vitamin C, magnesium, iron, copper, and manganese. They are a good source of potassium and several essential amino acids, and they also contain significant amounts of riboflavin, niacin, calcium, phosphorus, and zinc. Pawpaws contain these nutrients in amounts that are generally about the same as or greater than those found in bananas, apples, or oranges.

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Monday, November 27, 2006

Clover Wine



Red clover wine can be made with either fresh or dried red clover flowers. Pick the clover flowers early in the morning, but after any dew from the early morning pre-dawn has evaporated. After picking, remove the stems and wash the flowerheads well. You can pick more flowers than needed and dry them for future use. To dry, lay them on a cookie sheet and let the pilot from your gas oven dry them. Turn every 2-3 hours until absolutely dry. If you don't have a gas oven, you'll have to use a dehydrator. When dried, measure 2-1/2 ounces by weight and seal these in a ZipLoc bag for later use to make one gallon of wine. Use recipes below, substituting dried flowers for fresh.



RED CLOVER WINE




  • 1 qt fresh red clover flowers
  • 1 pint white grape juice (reconstituted from concentrate)
  • 2-1/4 lb finely granulated sugar
  • 2 tsp acid blend
  • 1 tsp yeast nutrient
  • 1/4 tsp tannin
  • water to one gallon
  • wine yeast

Bring 1/2 gallon water to boil and dissolve sugar in it.
Destem and wash the flowers and put in primary.
Pour boiling water over flowers and add grape juice, acid blend, tannin, yeast nutrient, and water to bring up to one gallon total liquid.
When lukewarm, add yeast. Knock down cap 2-3 times daily.
After 7 days, strain liquor into secondary and fit airlock.
Rack after 60 days, top up, refit airlock and set aside 4 months.
Wine should be clear.
Stabilize, wait 10 days, rack, sweeten to taste, and bottle.
Wait 6 months before tasting. [Adapted recipe from W.H.T. Tayleur's The Penguin Book of Home Brewing & Wine-Making

Monday, November 20, 2006

Gluhwein or "Glow Wine"













Not having been a wine drinker until I started making wine, I 've never had to make a mulled wine. This Christmas season, I'm finally going to make and sample some mulled wine or as the Germans call it gluhwein. Gluhwein or "Glow Wine" sounds pretty interesting and I'm looking forward to giving it a try.

I found a couple recipes and fiqured that I would pass them along to you. The first comes from the German Embassy in Washington DC and the second one comes from Virtual Finland.

Enjoy!!!


German Recipe

Germans enjoy Gluhwein or "Glow Wine" quite a bit around Christmas and New Year's Day. A favorite place to sip a warming glass is outside at the Christmas market.

(makes 24 glasses)

Ingredients:

2 bottles red wine
1 cup sugar
3 cups water
1 lemon, sliced
20 whole cloves
6 to 8 cinnamon sticks
1 orange, sliced for garnish

Directions:
Mix water, lemon and spices and simmer for an hour. Strain. Heat but do not boil the red wine. Add wine to hot water mixture. Ladle into cups and serve with half a slice of orange.


Finland Recipe

Christmas glogg

1 bottle red wine
2-3 tablespoons Madeira (optional)
1/2 cup raw sugar, or to taste
1/3 cup raisins
1-2 sticks cinnamon
5-6 whole cloves
peelings of 1 orange
1/4 cup blanched, slivered almonds
1/4 cup vodka to spike it up (optional)

In a large kettle, combine all the ingredients except the vodka. Heat slowly, until the drink is steaming hot. Stir every now and then, and taste with a spoon whenever you feel like it. Do not let the drink get even close to boiling. Just keep it warm. Before serving, add vodka if you wish.

Servings: 1 to 6



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Monday, November 13, 2006

Cranberry Universal Recipe

       
  Type of Fruit Cranberries  
  Weight Needed 4 pounds  
  Preparation crush  
  Water 1 gallon  
  Acid Blend none  
  Campden Tablets 2  
  Yeast Nutrient 1 teaspoon  
  Sugar 3 pounds  
  Raisins 1 1/2 pounds  
  Pectin Enzyme 1/2 teaspoon  
  Grape Tannin none  
  Yeast   1 packet  
       



Here's a universal recipe that I'm sure that can be made during this time of the year. One that I'll probably be trying during the next several weeks.

Monday, November 06, 2006

Blueberry Universal Recipe


Type of Fruit Blueberries

Weight Needed 2 pounds

Preparation crush

Water 1 gallon

Acid Blend 3 teaspoons

Campden Tablets 2

Yeast Nutrient 1 teaspoon

Sugar 2 1/2 pounds

Raisins 1 pound

Pectin Enzyme 1/2 teaspoon

Grape Tannin none

Yeast 1 packet




You might be able to use frozen blueberries or canned blueberries with this recipe.


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Monday, October 30, 2006

Basic Universal Wine Recipe












Here are the steps needed to make wine using the universal wine recipe method. All the recipes are designed to make a 1 gallon batch. These recipes are great whenever you get dumped with a bunch of fruit from a friend or neighbor. I intended to post about 10 more of these recipes.

1. Grab your primary fermenter, clean and sterilize it.

2. Prepare the fruit as indicated.

3. Mix all the ingredients, crushing the Campden tablets before adding them. Make sure that the sugar is dissolved. Cover and let it be for 1 day.

4. Add the yeast.

5. Cover and let ferment for about 4 - 7 days. Make sure that you stir twice a day to punch down the cap.

6. After the primary fermentation, strain, and place into a secondary fermenter. Rack as needed until the wine is clear.

7. Bottle and enjoy your wine.



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Monday, October 23, 2006

Barley Wine

Barley Wine


  • 1/4 lb barley
  • 1/2 pint grape concentrate(or 1 lb raisins)
  • 2 lemons(or 4 tsp citric acid)
  • 2 1/2 lb sugar
  • amylozyme(follow directions on label)
  • 1 campden tablet
  • 1 gallon water
  • yeast and nutrient

soak barley in a pint of water overnight.
grind the barley and raisins in a mincer.
put sugar,barley,and raisins in a polythene bucket and pour on hot(not boiling)water.
add the juice of lemons or use citric acid.allow to cool then add amylozyme and a crushed campden tablet. cover and leave for 24 hrs.
add yeast and nutrient cover well,and leave for 8 days,stirring daily.
strain into fermenting jar.
rack when fermentation is complete and wine is clear.
age 6 months.
Usually I think of barley wine as a beer product that uses malted barley and is high on the alcohol content. This recipe is different and I'll probably give it a try.

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Monday, October 16, 2006

Pear Wine


Every wonder what to do with all the pears that your neighbor just dropped off?  Instead of just eating them or throwing them away, why not make a batch of pear wine?  Here is a recipe that makes 1 gallon.
  • Pears 4/5 lbs.
  • Sugar 2 lbs.
  • Potassium Sorbate (as directed for your style)
  • Citric Acid
  • Water 1 gallon
  • Pectic Enzyme
  • Wine yeast
  • Yeast nutrient

Chop up the pears and place into a large fermenting bin.
Add the sugar and citric acid to the bin and then boil the water and pour in.
Stir until the sugar has completely dissolved then leave to cool.
Once cool, add the pectic enzyme, stir and leave for 24 hours.
Add the yeast and nutrient and then place in a warm place.
Stir daily for 5 days then rack off into a carboy and fit a bung and airlock.
Rack off for the first time after 3 months.
Prior to bottling, add the potassium sorbate to stabilize and prevent additional fermentation.


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Monday, October 09, 2006

Cranberry Wine

 
Here's an idea for a holiday wine since cranberries are usually abundant in the next couple of months.  I tried a local winery's cranberry wine and it was excellent.  Think I'll make a batch for Christmas.
 
  • Cranberries 1 lb
  • Water 1 Gallon
  • Sultanas (minced) 1.5 lb
  • Sugar 2 lb
  • Yeast
  • Yeast Nutrient
  • Citric Acid 0.5 tsp

Place the minced sultanas in a fermenting bin and cover in 2 litres of boiling water.
 
Add the sugar and stir until dissolved.
 
Add the acid and allow to cool.
 
Cover the cranberries with boiling water and crush all of the berries.
 
Pour into the fermenting bin and allow to cool.
 
Once cooled, add the pectic enzyme and stir well.
 
Cover and leave to stand for 24 hours.
 
Add the yeast and nutrient and stir well and then cover and move to a warm place to ferment.
 
After 10 days, strain off into a carboy and fit a bung and airlock and then leave in a warm place to ferment out.
 
Clear and bottle the wine as usual once fermentation has completed.
 

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Monday, October 02, 2006

Tea Wine

This is a recipe for Tea Wine.  I made a batch in May and just bottled it a few days ago. I made it out of orange-tangerine tea and just throw everything in and allowed it to ferment.  My recipe is at the bottom if you want to try it.  My wine ended up tasting like orange tea but with a little kick.


TEA WINE



  • 8 teaspoons of dry tea leaves.
  • 1 pound of raisins
  • 2 lemons
  • 3 lb. sugar
  • 3/4 tsp. pectic enzyme
  • 3/4 tsp. yeast nutrient
  • "all purpose" wine yeast

Bring one quart of water to the boil. Remove from heat and add the tea leaves. Let the tea steep for ten minutes, then strain into the primary fermenting vessel. Discard the spent tea leaves. Boil half the sugar in half a gallon of water for a minute or two. When it is cool, add it to the tea. Run the raisins through a meat grinder, or find some other way to chop them, and add them to the fermenting vessel. Juice the lemons and add the juice to the mixture. Then slice the lemons and add them, too. (It is better to add only the yellow part of the lemon rind. The white can be bitter, Stir in the yeast nutrient and the pectic enzyme. These may not be necessary. It never hurts to add them but it can hurt to leave them out should you need them. add them to be safe. let it sit overnight. Then pitch the yeast. After a week or ten days strain through cloth into the jug or carboy. Boil the rest of the sugar in the rest of the water. When it is cool, add it to the carboy. Make the volume up with water. It may take a while to finish fermenting. However, it has always cleared nicely and rapidly when done. Other than chopping the raisins, this is an easy wine to make.
Orange Tea Wine
28 oz sugar
3/4 gallon water
1.5 ounces orange tangerine tea (loose)
montrachet yeast
1 tablespoon acid blend
1 teaspoon yeast nutrient
I mixed everything together, added the yeast and allowed it to ferment.   I racked it several times and bottled it just a few days ago. 


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Monday, September 25, 2006

Concord Grape Universal Recipe


Friend of the family stopped in last week after picking a bunch of Concord grapes.  Of, course I said that I would take some and he brought over a large colander filled with grapes.  It's times like this that call for a recipe that you can use rather quickly.   I used this recipe last year when the nieghbor asked if I wanted her grapes.  Works extremely well and the wine usually tastes great.
Here are the steps needed to make wine using the universal wine recipe method.  The recipe is designed to make a 1 gallon batch. 
1.  Grab your primary fermenter, clean and sterilize it.
2.  Prepare the fruit as indicated.
3.  Mix all the ingredients, crushing the Campden tablets before adding them.  Make sure that the sugar is dissolved.  Cover and let it be for 1 day.
4.  Add the yeast.
5.  Cover and let ferment for about 4 - 7 days.  Make sure that you stir twice a day to punch down the cap.
6.  After the primary fermentation, strain, and place into a secondary fermenter.  Rack as needed until the wine is clear.
7.  Bottle and enjoy your wine.
Ingredients

       
  Type of Fruit Concord Grape  
  Weight Needed 6 pounds  
  Preparation crush  
  Water 1 gallon  
  Acid Blend none  
  Campden Tablets 2  
  Yeast Nutrient 1 teaspoon  
  Sugar 2 1/2 pounds  
  Raisins none  
  Pectin Enzyme 1/2 teaspoon  
  Grape Tannin none  
  Yeast   1 packet  
       


 
Notes:  I used 6 cups of sugar since 5 pounds of sugar will contain 11 to 12 cups.  Also used Lavlin Burgundy yeast and looks like my yield to from the first racking is about 1 1/2 gallons.

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Monday, September 18, 2006

Gooseberry Wine



Green Gooseberry Wine(one gallon)


  • 5 lb ripe green gooseberries
  • 2 lb sugar
  • 6-7 pints water
  • yeast nutrient
  • yeast
  • pectic enzyme


or a lighter version


  • 2 1/2 lb gooseberries
  • 2 lb sugar
  • 1 campden tablet
  • 1/2 tsp acid blend
  • 1/2 tsp yeast nutrient
  • 1/4 tsp grape tannin
  • 1/2 tsp pectic enzyme
  • 1 gallon water
  • wine yeast
starting specific gravity should be 1.080-1.085,acid .65%

top,tail and wash the berries,put into a large bucket and squeeze by hand until they are pulpy. add the enzyme and water.(for lighter version add campden tablet,let sit 12 hrs,then add the rest of the ingredients except the yeast) allow to stand for 3 days,well covered,stir occasionally. strain then add the sugar(in lighter version this is already done),stirring until it is dissolved. then add the yeast and yeast nutrient. put into fermenting bottle until fermentation has finished.rack then rack again in 6 months. age for 1 year.
This little tidbit was taken from a New York State 4H website that tells you what a goosebeery is.

What about it?
The gooseberry is a close relative of the currant, and its culture is very similar. There are white, green, yellow and red-fruited varieties; most are slightly smaller or about the same size as a table grape. Although gooseberries are not popular in this country, they have some very nice characteristics! In addition to being a tasty, easy-to-grow fruit, gooseberries can be an effective barrier plant (nobody would walk through those thorns!) and are one of the few fruits that tolerate shade. They grow to 3-5 feet and have small, attractive, palmate leaves.
If you want more info, check out their website.


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Tuesday, September 12, 2006

Pear Wine

Pears are plentiful this time of the year.  Some of your friends and nieghbors may have tried pawning off a bunch to you.  Do what I do, accept them and then begin to make them into wine.  This is a simple recipe for pear wine and one that you should enjoy making.

 

Traditional Pear Wine Recipe



1 gallon water
5 lbs very ripe pears
1 lb raisins
2 lbs ultra fine sugar
1 ½ teaspoons acid blend
½ teaspoon pectic enzyme
1 teaspoon yeast nutrient
1 package wine yeast

Boil water in large pot. Chop pears and place in primary fermentation container. Add the sugar and citric acid to the container. Pour water over fruit and stir until sugar has dissolved. Let cool until room temperature. Add the pectic enzyme and let liquid rest for 1 day. Add the yeast and yeast nutrient, cover, and place in warm, dark location. Stir daily for 1 week. Rack into secondary fermentation container. Seal with airlock. Rack into bottles in 3 months. Let rest for at least one year.

Note:  I usually post on Mondays, but decided to not post on September 11th.  I felt it was more important to remember that day than to post on the blog.


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Monday, September 04, 2006

Sweet Potato Wine

 

Turkey and sweet potato wine for Thanksgiving, sounds like a winner.  Or, maybe, the wine is for sipping during the football games. 

Ingredients

 
  • 12 cups chopped sweet potatoes or yams
  • 5 1/2 cups granulated sugar
  • 2 cups light raisins
  • 1 teaspoon yeast nutrients
  • 2 oranges
  • 1/2 teaspoon pectic enzyme
  • 1 campden tablet
  • water
  • 1 package wine yeast

Peel and chop sweet potatoes fine. Place in large pot and cover with water. Bring to a boil. Simmer 25 minutes. Chop raisins and put into primary fermentor with sugar. Strain liquid into primary fermentor and squeeze all liquid out of the pulp. Pulp can now be used for sweet potato pie or other recipe.

Add enough water to make up to 1 gallon. Slice oranges thinly. Add all other ingredient EXCEPT yeast. Stir to dissolve sugar. Let sit overnight.

Next day, Specific Gravity should be 1.090 - 1.100. Stir in yeast. Stir daily for 5 to 6 days or until frothing ceases. Siphon into secondary fermentor and attach airlock.

For a dry wine, rack in three weeks, and every three months for one year. Bottle.

For a sweet wine, rack at three weeks. Add 1/2 cup sugar dissolved in 1 cup wine. Stir gently, and place back into secondary fermentor. Repeat process every six weeks until fermentation does not restart with the addition of sugar. Rack every three months until one year old. Bottle.

If wine is not clear, or still has quite a bit of sediment forming between rackings, Fine the wine as follows:

Use wine finings or plain gelatin. Gelatin: use 1 teaspoon per 6 gallons of wine. Finings: 1/2 teaspoon per 5 gallons or as per package directions. Soak in 1/2 cup cold water for 1/2 hour. Bring to a boil to dissolve. Cool. Stir into wine. Let sit 10 to 14 days. Rack. If not clear enough yet, repeat process. DO NOT increase amount of gelatin or finings. The mixture will stay suspended in the wine, preventing it from ever clearing. Bottle once wine is clear.

The wine is best if you can refrain from drinking it for one full year from the date it was started.


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Monday, August 28, 2006

Apple Wine

Hey, apple time is just around the corner.  Actually, in some spots you can get them fresh now.  This is a nice one to serve on Thanksgiving along with a dash of cinnamon.








  • 16 cups apples, cored and chopped
  • 2 pounds raisins
  • 1 cinnamon stick (optional)
  • 4 1/2 cups granulated sugar
  • 1 teaspoon yeast nutrients
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon acid blend
  • 1/2 teaspoon pectic enzyme
  • 1 campden tablet
  • 1 gallon water, hot
  • 1 package wine yeast (for 1 to 5 gallons)
Place fruit in primary fermentor. Pour boiling water over it. Let sit overnight.
24 hours later, add balance of ingredients. Stir to dissolve sugar. Stir daily for 5 to 6 days or until frothing ceases. Strain out fruit and squeeze as much juice out of it as you can. Siphon into secondary fermentor and attach airlock.
For a dry wine, rack in three weeks, and every three months for one year. Bottle.
For a sweet wine, rack at three weeks. Add 1/2 cup sugar dissolved in 1 cup wine. Stir gently, and place back into secondary fermentor. Repeat process every six weeks until fermentation does not restart with the addition of sugar. Rack every three months until one year old. Bottle.
If wine is not clear, or still has quite a bit of sediment forming between rackings, Fine the wine as follows.
Use wine finings or plain gelatin. Gelatin: use 1 teaspoon per 6 gallons of wine. Finings: 1/2 teaspoon per 5 gallons or as per package directions. Soak in 1/2 cup cold water for 1/2 hour. Bring to a boil to dissolve. Cool. Stir into wine. Let sit 10 to 14 days. Rack. If not clear enough yet, repeat process. DO NOT increase amount of gelatin or finings. The mixture will stay suspended in the wine, preventing it from ever clearing. Bottle once wine is clear.
The wine is best if you can refrain from drinking it for one full year from the date it was started.
NOTE: The best apples to use are tart apples such as winesap, jonathans, etc and not the delicious apples.


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Monday, August 21, 2006

Concord Wine Recipe


I read an article in the paper today about how good the grape crop will be in and around the Lake Erie area.  So, I fiqured I would dust of this old recipe for one of my Concord Wines.  This was quite the learning experience, using actual grapes, but in the long run it was worth it.  If I could do it over again, I would not have made juice out of a portion of them.  Live and Learn.
This recipe is the first time that I used actual grapes to make wine. I picked the grapes at my bosses's father's house on an October afternoon. October 2003 was not a real good year for grapes in my area, so they were more tart then sweet. I did eventually add a couple container's of Welch's Grape Juice to the must, but that was after the original had mostly fermented. This wine ended up being an average wine.
Ingredients:
40 Pounds Concord Grapes
7 1/2 Pounds Sugar
6 Teaspoons Yeast Nutrient
2 Packs Pasteur Red Yeast

First time using real grapes, we crushed 20 pounds cold and made juice out of the other half by heating them
Racked October 5, 2003 to primary fermenter
Racked October 17, 2003 and added 33 oz Welchs Frozen Grape Juice Concentrate along with 1 cup sugar to top off

Still a work in progress, tasted in December and it still has a high acid factor

Update:  This wine did turn out decent, just took about a year.


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Monday, August 14, 2006

Tropical Wine

I found this recipe on Jack Keller's site and renamed it Tropical Wine. The original name is Orange-Pineapple-Coconut.  For my recipe, I made 1 gallon and used 2 Pina Colada frozen mix cans and 1 frozen pineapple juice can and 1 frozen orange juice can for the ingredients.


Orange-Pineapple-Coconut

Bob Arndt is a relatively new winemaker and has written to me many times trying to understand the nuances of his new hobby. He created this wine....



  • 32 oz. orange juice (Tropicana, not from concentrate, in 64 oz. carton in dairy section)
  • 32 oz. pineapple juice (Dole, not from concentrate, in 46 oz can)
  • 6- 11.8 oz cans young coconut juice with pulp (strained) not coconut milk or cream, mine is from Thailand
  • 3 cups sugar or 1.095
  • 1 tsp. grape tannin
  • 1 campden tablet
  • 1/8 tsp. pectic enzymes (liquid)
  • 1 tsp. acid blend
  • 1 tsp. yeast nutrient
  • 2.5 grams Montrachet yeast

Mix juices. Check specific gravity, then mix 1 quart of juice with sugar, bring to 110 degrees, mixing until sugar is completely dissolved. Add sugar mixture to juice and lower temperature to 75 degrees with sandwich bag filled with ice cubes. Add crushed and dissolved Campden, acid blend and grape tannin. After 12 hours add pectic enzyme. After 12 more hours, add yeast nutrient and yeast. Ferment in primary to 1.010-1.025. Rack to secondary, top up and fit with airlock. Ferment as long as you can wait (usually 30 days for me). [Recipe by Bob Arndt, location unknown]


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Monday, August 07, 2006

Apple Wine

  • 6 cups apples, cored and chopped
  • 2 pounds raisins
  • 1 cinnamon stick (optional)
  • 4 1/2 cups granulated sugar
  • 1 teaspoon yeast nutrients
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon acid blend
  • 1/2 teaspoon pectic enzyme
  • 1 campden tablet
  • 1 gallon water, hot
  • 1 package wine yeast (for 1 to 5 gallons)
Place fruit in primary fermentor. Pour boiling water over it. Let sit overnight.
24 hours later, add balance of ingredients. Stir to dissolve sugar. Stir daily for 5 to 6 days or until frothing ceases. Strain out fruit and squeeze as much juice out of it as you can. Siphon into secondary fermentor and attach airlock.
For a dry wine, rack in three weeks, and every three months for one year. Bottle.
For a sweet wine, rack at three weeks. Add 1/2 cup sugar dissolved in 1 cup wine. Stir gently, and place back into secondary fermentor. Repeat process every six weeks until fermentation does not restart with the addition of sugar. Rack every three months until one year old. Bottle.
If wine is not clear, or still has quite a bit of sediment forming between rackings, Fine the wine as follows.
Use wine finings or plain gelatin. Gelatin: use 1 teaspoon per 6 gallons of wine. Finings: 1/2 teaspoon per 5 gallons or as per package directions. Soak in 1/2 cup cold water for 1/2 hour. Bring to a boil to dissolve. Cool. Stir into wine. Let sit 10 to 14 days. Rack. If not clear enough yet, repeat process. DO NOT increase amount of gelatin or finings. The mixture will stay suspended in the wine, preventing it from ever clearing. Bottle once wine is clear.
The wine is best if you can refrain from drinking it for one full year from the date it was started.
NOTE: The best apples to use are tart apples such as winesap, jonathans, etc and not the delicious apples.

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